On Hellbound

This month, Los Angeles finally opened a museum for the movies. It’s telling that it took LA over a century to open a commemoration of its greatest achievement — California has never been much for dwelling on the past. Yet I wonder if the opening of the museum is also something on a tombstone, marking the end of the era when Hollywood ruled the world.

I pondered this as I watched the latest Netflix hit show, Hellbound. It’s a South Korean…

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Author of Philosophy for Life and other books. Honorary fellow, Centre for the History of the Emotions. www.philosophyforlife.org.

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Jules Evans

Jules Evans

Author of Philosophy for Life and other books. Honorary fellow, Centre for the History of the Emotions. www.philosophyforlife.org.

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